Climate Extremes in the High Plains Region

The High Plains region is known for its weather and climate extremes. The new Climate Extremes in the High Plains Region page provides a number of resources that are available to help you and your community monitor the latest conditions.






Previous Months

Date Title Author

Latest Webinars and Briefings

Monthly Webinars

NWS Briefings

Quarterly Impacts and Outlooks

National Weather Service River Forecast Centers

Arkansas-Red Basin RFC

Colorado Basin RFC

Missouri Basin RFC

North Central RFC

Northwest RFC

West Gulf RFC

Weather and Climate Forecasts and Outlooks

National Weather Service

Storm Prediction Center

Climate Prediction Center

Climate Monitoring Resources

Temperature and Precipitation Maps

Temperature and Precipitation Graphs

Temperature and Precipitation Data

Streamflow

Snowpack

Mountain Snowpack

Soil Moisture

Vegetation

Evaporative Demand

Local Flood Resources

High Plains Weekly Drought Update - August 6, 2020


Gannon Rush - High Plains Regional Climate Center
2020-08-06


Both improvements and degradations in drought conditions occurred this past week, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. Severe drought (D2) was introduced in northeastern Nebraska, and moderate drought (D1) and abnormally dry (D0) conditions were expanded in southeastern South Dakota. D1 expanded slightly in the tri-state area of Colorado, Nebraska, and Wyoming. As for improvements, D1 and D0 conditions were reduced in southern and eastern Kansas, central Nebraska, and western South Dakota.

According to the August 4th USDA Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin, pasture conditions improved in several states but continued to degrade in Wyoming and Colorado. The percent of pastureland rated poor to very poor was 53% in Wyoming and 41% in Colorado. Winter wheat harvest is ahead of the 5-year average in all states and is completed in Kansas. Corn conditions are, for the most part, faring well across the region except for Colorado, where 25% of corn was rated as being in poor or very poor condition.
 
The Climate Prediction Center’s 6-10 day outlook has increased chances for above-normal temperatures across most of the High Plains except for western Wyoming. Increased chances for above-normal precipitation are present across much of North Dakota and northeastern South Dakota, while increased chances for below-normal precipitation are present in Colorado, Wyoming, the majority of both Kansas and Nebraska, and southwestern South Dakota. The National Weather Service’s 7-day Quantitative Precipitation Forecast predicts that some precipitation will occur in all states, with the greatest amounts expected in eastern North Dakota.

Previous Weeks

Date Title Author
Jun 25 2020High Plains Weekly Drought Update - June 25, 2020 Gannon Rush - High Plains Regional Climate Center
Jul 02 2020High Plains Weekly Drought Update - July 2, 2020 Gannon Rush - High Plains Regional Climate Center
Jul 09 2020High Plains Weekly Drought Update - July 9, 2020 Gannon Rush - High Plains Regional Climate Center
Jul 23 2020High Plains Weekly Drought Update - July 23, 2020 Gannon Rush - High Plains Regional Climate Center
Jul 30 2020High Plains Weekly Drought Update - July 30, 2020 Gannon Rush - High Plains Regional Climate Center
Jul 16 2020High Plains Weekly Drought Update - July 16, 2020 Gannon Rush - High Plains Regional Climate Center
Aug 06 2020High Plains Weekly Drought Update - August 6, 2020 Gannon Rush - High Plains Regional Climate Center

Latest Webinars and Briefings

Weekly National Drought Summary

Monthly Webinars

Quarterly Impacts and Outlooks

U.S. Drought Monitor Maps

National

Missouri Watershed

High Plains

U.S. Drought Monitor Change Maps

National - 1 Month

Missouri Watershed - 1 Month

High Plains - 1 Month

Weather and Climate Forecasts and Outlooks

National Weather Service

National Interagency Fire Center

Climate Predication Center

Climate Monitoring Resources

Temperature and Precipitation Maps

Temperature and Precipitation Graphs

Temperature and Precipitation Data

Soil Moisture

Vegetation

Evaporative Demand

Local Drought Resources